The Golden Ball at Camp Agape: Telling Stories to Children of Incarcerated Parents

Posted by on August 30, 2017.

Walking into Camp Agape is wonderful. I’m greeted with smiles and cheers of “the storyteller’s here!” People might think kids who have a parent or caregiver or two under supervision of the Vermont Correctional Department might be nothing but trouble. Will kids with troubled backgrounds stay still and listen to folk and fairy tales?

7 Uniquely Fun Storytelling Activities to Do With Kids

Posted by on December 1, 2016.

Image Source: Transition Town Totnes

 

Storytelling is a great opportunity to widen a child’s imagination. In this article, we share with you 7 unique activities to make the experience a lot more fun.

Children develop their imagination at a very young age, and through activities like storytelling, you can help your child develop his/her language skills and help them think creatively.

Mothers and Kids: Togetherness

Posted by on May 15, 2015.

At CLiF, much of our work occurs behind the scenes. We spend many hours scheduling events, organizing logistics, communicating with coordinators who are on the ground in various communities throughout Vermont and New Hampshire. While we love what we do, nothing compares to hanging up the phone, logging off our email, and stepping out from behind our desks to get face-to-face with the communities, families, and children we serve.

CLiF Spotlight: More than 800 Books!

Posted by on January 6, 2014.

Bridgeside Books donates 320 books to CLiF through their 2013 Giving Tree

Above: Joan Eldred, Hiata DeFeo, and Duncan celebrate Bridgeside Books’ Giving Tree book drive: the Waterbury bookstore collected 320 books to benefit CLiF.

 

We don’t have all the books counted yet, but I can’t wait to tell you. This holiday season, book drives brought in more than 800 books to give kids served through CLiF programs.

CLiF Spotlight: A Day On the Road with Duncan

Posted by on December 13, 2013.

CLiF serves many thousands of children each year across New Hampshire and Vermont – a service area of 19,000 square miles. I’m on the road a great deal, giving presentations and meeting with kids, parents, teachers, coordinators, presenters, and donors.

Thursday, December 12, 2013 was an unusually long day for me: 17 hours and 372 miles.

Capturing Small Moments: Using Technology to Tell Stories

Posted by on August 19, 2013.

One goal of CLiF’s Year of the Book program is to help teachers engage students with reading and writing in new and creative ways. To that end we offer mini-grants to teachers in Year of the Book schools to develop projects that meet this goal.

Calling Rural Libraries: Apply for Grant, Attend Conference

Posted by on August 1, 2013.

Fifteen years ago CLiF’s very first literacy program supported rural public libraries. We’re delighted to once again offer the Rural Library Sponsorship and support public libraries and schools in New Hampshire and Vermont’s small towns. CLiF is accepting applications through September 16, 2013.

Summer Readers Underway!

Posted by on July 22, 2013.

48 different children’s summer programs across Vermont and New Hampshire. 3,300 kids.
Two free books per child.

That’s a lot of books. No wonder the CLiFmobile just needed its shocks replaced.

Barre Pool 2013

Rec program at the Barre Municipal Pool in Barre, VT

From June through August, CLiF’s Summer Readers program visits lunch programs, low-income summer camps, and summer schools to combat “summer slide” — the attrition of literacy skills outside the structure of school to which low-income and at-risk children are especially susceptible.

Giving You the Floor: Bolstering Parental Involvement

Posted by on July 10, 2013.

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Our excitement is ramping up for the newest Year of the Book town kickoffs, and we are thinking a lot about successes and lessons learned when looking back over our first year of offering this grant. We have been excited to hear about the burgeoning relationships between the school and the public library, the changed culture among students who are now seeing books as “cool,” and the inspired poems written by children who used to claim they hated to write.